Project Description

Plastic soup

Plastic soup

“In recent years, they’ve been detected in a growing number of lakes and rivers worldwide. They’re everywhere, and often at alarming levels,”
Anthony Ricciardi, professor, McGill School for the Environment

Today, plastic is the most common type of artificial debris found in our lakes and oceans.

As it stands, Canadian lakes and rivers are filling up with plastic, bottled water is contaminated with plastic, and our oceans are running out of oxygen.

The state of water

While nearly 70% of the world is covered by water, only 2.5% of it is fresh. It is imperative that we keep our lakes and waterways free from plastics, litter, and other pollutants.

Today, microplastics are ubiquitous. They are found in marine water, wastewater, fresh water, and drinking-water – both bottled and tap.

The state of our oceans

Every other breath comes from the ocean.

Our oceans are filled with marine photosynthesizers, such as phytoplankton and seaweed, that produce over half our oxygen on land. These organisms use carbon dioxide, water and energy from the sun to generate food, while releasing oxygen in the process. This photosynthesizing is happening in our ocean and has been for millions of years. Today, humans and other animals rely on this oxygen in the atmosphere for survival, while sea animals extract it directly from ocean water. So, what’s it looking like now?

We are running out of oxygen

Roughly 700 ocean sites are suffering from low oxygen. This number has increased 15 times since the 1960s.

How?

Our oceans are like sponges. Every year, we generate more and more carbon dioxide which, in turn, leads to rising temperatures. This heat is then absorbed by our oceans. The result? Not pretty. Water hold less oxygen. Which means, less room to breath.

up to 40% of microfibers traveling to wastewater treatment plants are not filtered out.”

From a recent study by Patagonia

What does this mean for our marine world?

Even the smallest climate changes can have a significant impact on our oceans. With less oxygen in the water, bigger fish, such as tuna, marlin and sharks, can’t breathe.

Running out of oxygen means a rabid decline in biodiversity, habitat, and life on planet earth.

Solutions

We believe a shift from greenhouse gas emissions that are releasing carbon dioxide, as well as pollution from agriculture and plastic production are necessary.

What does this mean for our marine world?

Even the smallest climate changes can have a significant impact on our oceans. With less oxygen in the water, bigger fish, such as tuna, marlin and sharks, can’t breathe.

Running out of oxygen means a rabid decline in biodiversity, habitat, and life on planet earth.

Solutions

We believe a shift from greenhouse gas emissions that are releasing carbon dioxide, as well as pollution from agriculture and plastic production are necessary.

Ever heard of the great pacific garbage patch (GPGP) or pacific trash vortex?

The GPGP is an accumulation of marine debris in the North Pacific Ocean.

How did it get there?

Marine debris that is pushed from land or directly dumped into open waters is pulled towards a vortex in the ocean known as a ‘gyre’. Between Japan and Western North America, the GPGP is bounded by two massive collections of debris in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre.

What exist in the garbage patch?

Plastics! Plastics don’t just ‘go away’, they break down into smaller and smaller into pieces known as ‘microplastics’. These plastics can now be found in almost every layer of the ocean.

What does this mean for the marine world, and us?

Learn more about microplastics

How to help?

Please share this message and #drop the plastic. And donate to help us continue our mission to protecting our oceans and fresh waterways.

donate